PlayNitride launches new displays at SID 2020

PlayNitride introduced several new display technologies at SID DisplayWeek 2020. First up we have the PixeLED Matrix, which is a tiled microLED display module based display, each produced on its own PCB.

Each PixeLED module is made from 16 pixels (4X4), and can reach pitches of 0.3-0.4 mm. PlayNitride says that this technology can compete with mini LED displays, and says that it achieves a superior contrast and can also be fitted on curved surfaces. PixeLED displays can be used for TV displays, for commercial signage displays and also for automotive lighting. The display can currently achieve a maximum brightness of 2,000 nits.

Samsung faces technical issues and will have to delay the launch of its true microLED TVs

According to reports early in 2020, Samsung Electronics partnered with Epistar and PlayNitride that will enable Samsung to release its first true microLED TVs by the end of 2020. A new report from Korea suggests that Samsung is struggling with technology issues and it is not likely it will meet its goal of a product release in 2020.

Samsung 146'' micro-LED TV, The Wall

The reports suggest that production yields are very low - apparently Epistar is not able to provide Samsung with the millions of microLEDs required to produce its TVs. Another major issues is Samsung's transfer process which is still not accurate enough - with the result being that display assembly yields are painfully low.

Researchers develop a new method to transfer and bond microLED arrays on flexible plastic substrates

Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada developed a new transfer and bonding method to deposit a flexible microLED array on plastic substrates.

Flexible microLED paste-and-cut technique schema, University of Waterloo

The technique, referred to as a "paste-and-cut", starts with bonding the LEDs on a process/handle wafer are temporarily bonded (pasted) onto a glass substrate and are then released (cut) to the flexible substrate. This approach allows the LED to be optimized and then combined with other materials.

eLux's fluidic microLED technology and business explained

USA-based eLux was established in 2016 as a spin-off from Sharp Labs of America, to commercialize a unique MicroLED production technology. The company was in stealth mode for a few years, and is now finally discussing its technology and business. We talked to the company's president and CEO Jong-Jan Lee, who explains the company's technology, status and plans.

eLux's technology is based on a unique approach that moves microLEDs from wafer to the target substrate without the need of a pick-and-place process. The so-called fluidic process uses microLEDs dispersed in liquid and wells built onto the substrate. The microLED dispersion is spread over the substrate and the LEDs simply fall into place - a sort of self-assembly process, which can be seen in the video above.

We talk MicroLED displays with VueReal's CEO

Canada-based VueReal is a startup company that develop Micro-LED based microdisplays. The company's Continuous Pixelation micro-printing technology offers high density displays, high production yields and a simple design.

VueReal micro-led microdisplay prototype photo

VueReal's founder and CEO, Reza Chaji, was kind enough to answer a few questions we had on the company's technology and business.

Reza, thank you for your time. Can you explain VueReal's micro-printing process and technology?

VueReal’s solution is a true printing process where you do not need to pick LEDs for each transfer. It is based on a cartridge design by VueReal that releases the LEDs selectively into the substrate.

Korean companies develop packaged RGB microLED technology for easier transfer process

Seoul Viosys and Seoul Semiconductors have jointly developed a new MicroLED technology, called Micro Clean LED that basically packages three separate LEDs (red, green and blue) into a single "one-single MicroLED pixel".

The idea is that these packaged colored pixels will be easier to transfer to the target substrate compared to the transfer of three different LEDs. The package itself does not contain any driver ICs.

Mikro Mesa develops a cost-effective 4" RGB mass transfer process

Taiwan-based microLED developer Mikro Mesa announced that it achieved a breakthrough in its microLED transfer and bond process, which now enables the company to transfer 2-5 um microLED chips using a large 4-inch stamp.

Mikro Mesa microLED pixels macro photo

Mikro Mesa's new process can transfer color (RGB) vertically-structured microLED chips and create a full-color display. It can be used to create high-density dipslays - up to 1,800 PPI and be used to create large microLED TVs, over 55-inch in size. The new process is a low temperature one (below 200 degrees Celsius) and can be used on flexible substrates - and be also used to create transparent displays.

AU Optronics sees Micro-LED displays entering the market in the next 1-2 years

AU Optronics president, Paul Peng, says that he expects Micro-LED displays to enter the market within 1-2 years. The first displays will be large-area signage and small-sized VR displays. Micro-LEDs for the automotive market will take longer to commercialize - around 5 years.

AUO 12.1'' LTPS micro-LED prototype (August 2019)

AUO recently demonstrated a 12.1" LTPS micro-LED display prototype that features a resolution of 1920x720 (169 PPI). AUO discloses that this display was produced using the company's self-developed transfer process that can move 50,000 - 60,000 LEDs per transfer (AUO did not detail the time it takes to perform a single transfer, though). AUO is now developing repair technology to take care of damaged LEDs.