Yole: micro-IC based microLED production could lead to large disruptions in the display industry

Display market analysts from Yole Développement posted an interesting article, that speculates that Apple and Huawei are looking into microLED displays based on Si-CMOS micro-ICs. This model could have tremendous implications for the display market.

Display market disruption by microIC microLED displays (Yole)

The idea is that the device maker (Apple is likely to be the first to go down that route) will source micro LEDs from LED producers (or produce these in-house) and source microICs from foundries. Apple could then assemble these into its own displays, in-house. This means that in this model there's no room for traditional display makers which could lead to large disruptions in the display market, according to Yole.

PlayNitride launches new displays at SID 2020

PlayNitride introduced several new display technologies at SID DisplayWeek 2020. First up we have the PixeLED Matrix, which is a tiled microLED display module based display, each produced on its own PCB.

Each PixeLED module is made from 16 pixels (4X4), and can reach pitches of 0.3-0.4 mm. PlayNitride says that this technology can compete with mini LED displays, and says that it achieves a superior contrast and can also be fitted on curved surfaces. PixeLED displays can be used for TV displays, for commercial signage displays and also for automotive lighting. The display can currently achieve a maximum brightness of 2,000 nits.

iBeam Materials shows how to deposit both FETs and microLEDs directly on flexible metal foil substrates

iBeam Materials announced that it had successfully demonstrated the ability to produce high-performance GaN Field-Effect Transistors (FETs) directly on thin, flexible and rollable metal foil substrates.

This new technology complements iBeam's microLED deposition technology (demonstrated in the video above), and these FETs can be integrated with microLED chips in a side-by-side architecture. Both FETs and MicroLEDs are deposited on the flexible substrate without any transfer process.

CEA-Leti researchers developed a new CMOS-based process to produce high performance Micro-LED displays

Researchers at CEA-Leti developed a new process to produce high performance GaN Micro-LEDs displays, which the researchers say is simpler and more effective than current approaches.

CEA Leti RGB Micro-LED CMOS fabrication transfer method image

The first step in the new process is transferring the micro-LED chips directly on top of a CMOS wafer. In the second step each complete "pixel", made from a CMOS driving circuit and micro-LED chips, is transferred to the display substrate.

X-Celeprint uses BluGlass' RPCVD p-GaN production process to develop a 2,000 nits Micro-LED display

In March 2018, Australia-based RPCVD developer BluGlass announced that it has entered into a collaboration agreement with a microLED company to investigate the use of its Remote Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (RPCVD) production technology to produce RGB MicroLED devices.

X-Celeprint micro-LED prototype, using BluGlass RPCVD photo

BluGlass now announced that its partner is X-Celeprint, that used the process to demonstrate a 2,000 cd/m2 micro-LED display that offers good luminance with color uniformity, quantum efficiency and forward voltage that equals current high-performance commercial applications. BluGlass reveals that X-Celeprint has been a long-standing customer of BluGlass’ foundry services and were the first adopter of its RPCVD system for Micro-LED production.