Sony reveals its Cystal-LED MicroLED display prices in Europe

HDTVTest posted an interesting video showing Sony's 110" Crystal-LED micro-LED display at Sony's Basingstoke UK office, at a joint event organized with AWE, a Sony distributor in Europe. The reviewer is highly positive about Sony's Micro-LED display quality:

AWE offers Sony's Crystal LED displays, which are custom made, but the company did release a general price guideline:

  • 146" display - 350,000 Euro ($390,000)
  • 182" display - 500,000 Euro ($550,000)
  • 219" display - 700,000 Euro ($780,000).

See PlayNitride's latest flexible and transparent OLED prototypes

PlayNitride demonstrated its latest Micro-LED displays at SID DisplayWeek 2019, and the following recently-published video shows the company's booth and prototypes:

So first up we have a 7.56" 720x480 (114 PPI) transparent MicroLED display, which looks very impressive. This is the same Micro-LED display that TianMa demonstrated at its own booth. Interestingly, under direct light from it seems that the display is made from tiles - but PlayNitride says that the squares are made from the stamping process, and the company is developing technology that will remove these marks.

CSoT demonstrates a 3.3" transparent Micro-LED prototype produced in collaboration with PlayNitride

TCL subsidiary China Star (CSoT) demonstrated a 3.3" 232x116 transparent Micro-LED prototype display. The display is built on an Oxide-TFT (IGZO) backplane - CSoT says that this is the first such display ever demonstrated. The transparency is around 45%.

CSoT says that it developed the display in collaboration with PlayNitride that provided the transfer technology for CSoT.

JBD demonstrates 2-million nits and 10,000 PPI Micro-LED microdisplays

Shanghai-based Micro-LED microdisplay developer JBD unveiled its latest Micro-LED microdisplay prototypes. JBD's panels can achieve a high brightness of 2 million nits coupled with very high pixel density (5,000 PPI) on a monochrome green display.

JBD also demonstrated an even high pixel density display (10,000 PPI). JBD can currently produce either monochrome or dual-color (red and green) microdisplays, and is developing full-color ones.

Plessey and JDC demonstrate a Full-HD monolithic micro-LED microdisplay

In 2018, UK-based GaN-on-Si MicroLED developer Plessey Semiconductor announced a strategic partnership with Taiwan's s Jasper Display Corp (JDC). Under the partnership, Plessey will use JDC's silicon backplane to drive its monolithic micro-LED displays.

Today JDC and Plessey demonstrated the world's first GaN-on-Silicon monolithic full-HD (1920x1080) microLED bonded display. Plessey says that it has succeeded in wafer level bonding of its GaN-on-Silicon monolithic microLED wafers with JDC’s eSP70 silicon patented backplane technology, resulting in microLED displays that contain addressable LEDs. The pixel pitch of this display is 8 microns and the JDC backplane provides independent 10-bit single color control of each pixel.

Daktronics introduces its first mini-LED signage display

Display signage company Daktronics introduced its first mini-LED display, branded as the Optica. The company says that it achieved a resolution "similar to LCD display resolution" but at much higher brightness levels (6,000 nits) while drawing half the power. Daktronics actually calls this a Micro-LED display, but as the pixel pitch is 0.9mm, it cannot really be called a micro-LED.

It is not clear whether Daktronics produces the display panel itself, and how close it is to commercialize this technology. Daktronics says that it is possible to scale up its Optica displays (to pretty much unlimited sizes) - a Full-HD (1080x1920) Optical display will be 1.037 x 1.8434 meter in size, while a 4K one will be 2.074x3.686 meters.

Nanosys explains the advantages of QD-MicroLED displays

HDTVTest posted an interesting interview with Cadmium-Free QD developer Nanosys CEO and president Jason Hartlove. In this long interview Jason discusses the company's technology and recent achievements.

Jason explains that producing an RGB Micro-LED has many challenges as each color micro-LED chip is different - and different color LEDs need slightly different voltages and drive currents. The mechanical placement of these chips is also much more difficult for three colors. Using single-color (blue) Micro-LED chips and color-converting them using QDs makes a lot of sense for such displays - with easier manufacturing, longer lifetime, less differential aging (burn-in) and a wider color gamut.