Plessey and JDC demonstrate a Full-HD monolithic micro-LED microdisplay

In 2018, UK-based GaN-on-Si MicroLED developer Plessey Semiconductor announced a strategic partnership with Taiwan's s Jasper Display Corp (JDC). Under the partnership, Plessey will use JDC's silicon backplane to drive its monolithic micro-LED displays.

Today JDC and Plessey demonstrated the world's first GaN-on-Silicon monolithic full-HD (1920x1080) microLED bonded display. Plessey says that it has succeeded in wafer level bonding of its GaN-on-Silicon monolithic microLED wafers with JDC’s eSP70 silicon patented backplane technology, resulting in microLED displays that contain addressable LEDs. The pixel pitch of this display is 8 microns and the JDC backplane provides independent 10-bit single color control of each pixel.

Daktronics introduces its first mini-LED signage display

Display signage company Daktronics introduced its first mini-LED display, branded as the Optica. The company says that it achieved a resolution "similar to LCD display resolution" but at much higher brightness levels (6,000 nits) while drawing half the power. Daktronics actually calls this a Micro-LED display, but as the pixel pitch is 0.9mm, it cannot really be called a micro-LED.

It is not clear whether Daktronics produces the display panel itself, and how close it is to commercialize this technology. Daktronics says that it is possible to scale up its Optica displays (to pretty much unlimited sizes) - a Full-HD (1080x1920) Optical display will be 1.037 x 1.8434 meter in size, while a 4K one will be 2.074x3.686 meters.

Nanosys explains the advantages of QD-MicroLED displays

HDTVTest posted an interesting interview with Cadmium-Free QD developer Nanosys CEO and president Jason Hartlove. In this long interview Jason discusses the company's technology and recent achievements.

Jason explains that producing an RGB Micro-LED has many challenges as each color micro-LED chip is different - and different color LEDs need slightly different voltages and drive currents. The mechanical placement of these chips is also much more difficult for three colors. Using single-color (blue) Micro-LED chips and color-converting them using QDs makes a lot of sense for such displays - with easier manufacturing, longer lifetime, less differential aging (burn-in) and a wider color gamut.

TCL demonstrates an early Micro-LED prototype display

China-based TCL is demonstrating a what seems to be an early Micro-LED prototype display at CES 2019:

The Micro-LED display panel is produced by TCL's subsidiary CSoT. It is not clear whether this is a tiled display or a single small (12-inch?) monolithic module, hopefully we'll learn more about TCL's demonstration soon.

Samsung shows 75" and 219" Micro-LED displays at CES 2019

Samsung unveiled two new Micro-LED TVs at CES 2019. First up is the consumer model, a 75" Micro-LED TV that is made from tiled displays. We already reported on this TV in September 2018, and it is great to see Samsung manage to bring this display to CES - even if it is an early prototype.

Samsung did not reveal any details on this TV, or any plans to commercialize this technology soon. It would seem that when Samsung is ready, its Micro-LED TVs will be the company's flagship TV technology. It's current high end TVs use QD-enhanced LCDs (and the company is to be close to release a hybrid QD-OLED TV in 2019).

LG unveils its 173" Micro-LED TV at IFA 2018

As promised, LG unveiled its first Micro-LED TV prototype at IFA 2018, you can see the gigantic 173" TV in the video below.

LG indeed said that its first Micro-LED TV will indeed be larger than Samsung's 146-inch modular Wall. But Samsung's design is modular, and also Samsung seems to be more advanced as it started accepting pre-orders in June 2018 and will soon ship its Micro-LED TVs for commercial applications.

JBD unveils a 1 million nits MicroLED microdisplay

Shanghai-based Micro-LED microdisplay developer JBD demonstrated its latest Microdisplay that achieve an extremely high brightness - 1 million nits. The display resolution is VGA. JBD is already offering its monochrome VGA micro-LED microdisplays commercially (but we're not sure if these are the 1 million nits ones).

JBD's current micro-LED process still suffers from low yields, but the company hopes to achieve at least a 70% yield in the future, which will enable it to bring prices down to about $10 to $20 per display.