KAIST researchers develop flexible vertical micro-LEDs using an ACF-based transfer process

Researchers from Korea's KAIST developed flexible vertical micro-LEDs (f-VLEDs) using anisotropic conductive film (ACF)-based transfer and interconnection technology.

The researchers developed their own transfer equipment and used it to fabricate a 50x50 array of f-VLEDs using simultaneous transfer and interconnection through the precise alignment of ACF bonding process. The researchers report that the micro-LEDs achieved an optical power density of 30 mW/mm2 - which is three times higher than that of lateral micro LEDs. The LEDs offer improving thermal reliability and lifetime by reducing heat generation within the thin film LEDs.

Sony demonstrate two Crystal-LED displays at ISE 2018

Sony demonstrated two of its Micro-LED Crystal-LED "CLEDIS" integrated displays at ISE 2018. Sony's main displays at ISE was a large 8K x 2K Crystal-LED display, that reportedly was very impressive. Sony also demonstrated a small "Baby" Crystal-LED display, about 120-inch in size, at its booth.

Sony CLEDIS demonstration (ISE 2018)

According to Sony employees at the booth, the large CLEDIS took around 50 hours to build, and the cost of such a display is around $1.8 million. The smaller CLEDIS at around 120" will cost bout $500,000. I wish to thank Omar Ayers for providing the photos and the information from ISE.

Samsung signs a strategic agreement with San'an to co-develop Micro-LED chips for displays

LEDsInside reports that Samsung and China's largest LED producer San'an Optroelectronics signed a long-term agreement to co-develop Micro-LED displays. Under the agreement, Samsung pre-paid San'an $16.83 million to secure micro-LED chips.

Samsung 146'' micro-LED TV, The Wall

San'an says that following its Micro-LED development completion, it aims to become Samsung's major chip supplier. It is estimated that it will take San'an three years to achieve mico-LED mass production, but apparently it will supply Samsung with such chips throughout the next three years (maybe using a lower-volume production method).

Aledia raised $36 million from Intel Capital and existing investors

Aledia logoFrance-based 3D GaN LED developer Aledia announced its Series-C Financing round, totaling $36 million. Its existing investors participated in this round, and Aledia also announced that Intel Capital has joined as a new investor.

Aledia also says that it is developing next-generation Micro-LED displays with several large industrial partners. Aledia is developing both mobile displays (for smartphones, tablets, etc) and micro displays for AR/VR applications.

Seren Photonics completes the first tranche of a £1 million investment round

Seren Photonics logoUK-based Seren Photonics has successfully completed the first tranche of a £1 million investment round with funding from existing and new investors. Seren says that these funds will be used to continue the manufacturing scale-up of its template technology along with the further development of green LED epitaxy structures.

Seren develops a suite of long wavelength LED epitaxy on its novel semipolar GaN aimed at delivering higher efficiency and more color stable green, yellow and red devices. Seren says that its Semipolar enabled LEDs overcome shortcomings of green LEDs manufactured on polar GaN, mainly low wall plug efficiency and poor poor wavelength stability over a range of current densities.

Yole analyzes the Micro-LED patent landscape, sees complex legal battles ahead

Yole Developpement published an interesting article discussing the patent landscape of the MicroLED industry. As of today, almost 1,500 MicroLED patents were filed by 125 companies and organization. The overall corpus has an average of 3.2 years, which makes these patents quite new.

MicroLED patent families by company (January 2018, Yole)

The initial micro-LED patents, filed at around 2000-2001, were mostly by a variety of research institutes, by large companies such as Sony and Sharp but also by startups such as Luxvue (acquired by Apple). The activity in this field is still led mostly by startups, and with the exception of Sony and Sharp, mature display makers are relative latecomers.

Lumens demonstrates two Micro-LED automotive HUD prototypes

Korea-based LED developer Lumens is developing a Micro-LED based HUD for the automotive aftermarket, and at CES the company demonstrated two prototypes, a Direct-HUD and a project-based one.

Lumens MicroLED HUD prototype (CES 2018)

Lumen's HUDs use three monochrome (RGB) Micro-LED panels, which combined can reach 100,000 nits. The project one uses a projection lens for the image magnification. The smaller HUD uses the Micro-LED directly as the output to the combiner.

Researcher use a micro-LED in a blood sugar level contact lens

Researchers from Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) and Sungkyunkwan University contact lenses that has an ultra-sensitive blood glucose sensor that analyze tears.

Blood glucose level micro-LED contact lens photo

To the wearer, the contact lens appear like regular ones, but when the sensor detects fluctuations in the blood glucose level, it lights up the chipset and an embedded micro-LED that stays lit if the blood glucose level is normal, so the wearer understand his blood levels. The contact lens are powered by wirelessly transmitted electricity.

Plessey and Artemis to co-develop MicroLED based HUD displays

UK-based optical thin-film developer Artemis announced a partnership with Plessey Semiconductor to co-develop HUD displays that use Plessey's GaN-on-Si MicroLEDs and Artemis' thin-film coatings for HUDs.

Plessey MicroLED HUD prototype (CES 2018)

Plessey recently announced its new licensing platform and also its intentions to bring a monolithic MicroLED display to the market in H1 2018. Plessey demonstrated an HUD prototype powered by its MicroLED display.